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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a contradiction somewhere down there i'm not sure what it was. bad-- bad mood. and we were shooting in london in the ocean in winter. i was really grubby. but it was just 20 hours in, it was unbear-- this would have been embarrass sipping efian 20 hours in. i went for it. >> is it the kind of thing you're in the ocean and wishing you could go home? >> no, i was wishing i could drink the water. ( laughter ). >> did it affect why you were acting? >> yeah, apparently it helped. yeah. so-- ( applause ) >> dave: well, there you go. >> but, actually, we sung live for the movie. and that's the only scene we could not sing live. i couldn't have done it otherwise. obviously, the singers need water. otherwise you know what happens to your throat. but because of the water in the water tanks, that was the only scene in the whole movie we did later. >> explain this to me because you're an actor and this is a big-deal movie and you're in the water and pulling a ship ashore are and you really have your work cut out for you, and on top of everything else you have to sing right there. that's double the pres
, charles has been very, very exciting. first because when i went to london to the abbey road studio to listen to the whole thing almost rea with the contemporary orchestra in london it was amazing. amazing the experience of being there and seeing the whole thing and i have everything in my mind. it has been incredible. >> rose: >> seeing it on paper was incredible. >> it was. and the name also! (laughs) >> rose: this sonata you loved. >> loved. >> rose: did you present her with other ideas or did this -- is this where you knew to go because she already told you this is what inspires me? >> well, we tried -- we started out with a handful of ideas but it was -- from what javier told me this one jumped out for her. >> this is the one. >> rose: this is the one. >> the minute -- for probably the first 15 seconds carolina said "this is the one." >> but tom is the composer and the one who fix it is whole thing. i would not do any other. i love the way it sounded but i'm not pretending to be a composer so he's the key here. >> but you also said that fashion -- you said ts tohe "new york tim
% of the trades on the new york exchange, 60% of the trades on the london exchange, are high frequency, high speed algorithm mick trades where, you know, it's not 90 days or one month or 1 week, it's a few milli seconds. >> rose: let me go back in your own personal biography for a second. when you left washington. >> yeah. >> rose: having lost the presidential election in 2004. >> did you have to bring that up again. (laughter) >> rose: you were the first one to say that you are a recovering politician. >> yeah, yeah. >> rose: and there is enough time so that tre is unkelyo a rapse. >> yeah, my confidence is increasing. i'm on about step nine. >> rose: here's the question. when did al gore become the al gore we know today with the strong opinions that you have. if seems that you've been liberated to say what's on your mind with no sense of consequence for whatever damage -- >> sounds reckless. >> rose: well, not reckless but certainly liberatedment i'm serious. was there a time in which you basically said i got nothing to lose. >> freedom is just another word. >> rose: yeah. thanks to countries c
suits me fine. >> rose: you could have gone to london. >> coy have, yeah. >> rose: didn't want to do that. >> i'm not the kind of person who likes to be in a bureau. >> rose: explain that, what is it about you that doesn't want to be in a bureau. >> i don't like being told what to do. i think that-- i don't fit in those kinds of things. i like to do my own thing. it's a kind of freedom and i cherish that. >> rose: and we all know that some days you have to work really hard when the berlin wall fell i know i was on my feet for 42 hours. >> rose: 423 hours. >> after that i'm not sure what happened because i woke up in the backseat of a car. but yeah. >> rose: sober or not sober. >> no, no, i literally collapsed, yeah. but so what. it was the fall of the berlin wall. are you never going see it again. and some days you go places and will stay in a five star hotel and nothing will happen and whoa, they pay me to be here, you know, it's a great life. >> rose: let me talk about stories you have covered. remind me of the stories that were so meaningful to you. what are the stories that have,
came after you were, went to sequoia. so you're in london. you talk to the man a the dailtime anhe says i would go to america. that is where i would go. >> yeah. >> rose: so you come here. >> i came here and i couldn't afford to come here. so i applied for a bunch of scholarships to american universities and luckily enough got one that took me to the university of pennsylvania. >> rose: wharton. >> well, actually, no. not originally. it was for a masters in history. and then i wasn't too happy with the first few weeks of that program. and was wondering what else to do. because i knew i wanted to be in america. and they were very kind and let me transfer into the business school. but the very best thing that happened to me there was having-- being in a class with the author philip roth. so my binding memory of the university of pennsylvania is being introduced to philip roth and he had these people like norman mailer and other people who would come through the class a that s just fantastic. >> rose: you make your way to "time" magazine. >> yes. >> rose: and you write about steve jobs. >>
at the savoy hotel in london. >> (laughs) >> rose: (laughs) reading the "financial times." maybe with a cigar. >> i'm culturally diverse. >> rose: having tea. it shows you're a man of the world. >> i'm very culturally diverse. >> rose: great to have you here. >> thank you. >> rose: i hope we can do this agai >> absoluty. rose: if u n e championship or if you don't will you come back and review the year? >> as long as you invite me back i'll be here sitting at the round trabl. >> rose: thank you. good luck. >> thank you. have >> we'll be right back. stay with us. >> rose: taylor branch is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning author and scholar of the civil rights movement. his trilogy on the life of dr. martin luther king, jr. has helped many to better understand the history of race in america. in his latest book he turns again to the period he has studied and writn about for over 25 years. it's called "king years: heroic moments in the civil rights movement." i'm pleased to have taylor branch back at this table. welcome, sir. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: why the? the dedication is to stude
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)